Archive for the ‘Museum News’ Category

Featherfolio by Chris Maynard Opens March 11 a BIMA

bimaBainbridge Island Museum of Art  (BIMA) celebrates its Spring Exhibitions on Saturday, March 11 with a free public reception from 2:00-5:00 p.m. With work including a range of mediums from feathers and bark, to oils and stone sculpture, all of the Spring Exhibitions celebrate the inspiring beauty of the natural world that surrounds us, but that we don’t always take the time to see. Chris Maynard’s solo exhibition, “Featherfolio,” is a major highlight of BIMA’s Spring. Maynard, from Olympia, Washington, creates exquisite artwork using hand-cut feathers. The shows continue through Sunday, June 4. BIMA is open daily from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and regular museum admission is always free. shown: Give and Take by Chris Maynard.

Summer Wheat: Full Circle at the Henry Art Gallery

henryOn view at the Henry Art Gallery, on the western edge of the University of Washington campus, is Summer Wheat: Full Circle. Showing through  September 17, the exhibition features a suite of large-scale abstract-figurative paintings by New York-based artist Summer Wheat who brings celestial bodies and earthly creatures into a shared pictorial field to consider the relationship between the . cosmic realm and human existence.at.  Image: Strawberry Sun 2015-15. Acrylic paint, resin, on aluminum mesh. Image courtesy of the artist. Photo: Etienne Frossard.

Quilts of the Sierra Nevada Show at the Bellevue Arts Museum

bamquiltsThe Contact: Quilts of the Sierra Nevada by Ann Johnston is currently showing through June 11 at the Bellevue Arts Museum. The exhibition  features over 30 of Ann Johnston’s large-scale quilts inspired by the California Sierra Nevada range. Johnston’s quilts—made from cloth that the artist has dyed herself—make creative use of patterns and textures to create literal, abstract, and sometimes completely imaginative representations of the area.

Karin Kidder Appointed Executive Director of Bellevue Arts Museum–Assumes Position Immediately

Press release sent from the Bellevue Arts Museum just now:

bamkarinBellevue, WA—The BAM Board of Trustees has appointed Karin Kidder as the Museum’s Executive Director. Kidder has served as BAM’s Interim Executive Director since November. Before taking on the Interim Executive Director role, Kidder was BAM’s Director of Marketing and Communications.

Her appointment comes as the Museum celebrates over 70 years of its nationally recognized BAM ARTSfair and numerous critically acclaimed exhibitions. It recently received two significant gifts from the Kemper Development Company—the first a $1M challenge match, and the second a $1M donation for capital projects, which will be dedicated to exterior work on the building. Exterior work will begin in March and is anticipated to be complete by July in advance of the Museum’s major fundraising gala, Artful Evening, on July 15 and BAM ARTSfair which will be held July 28 – 30.

"Karin brings tremendous experience and skill to this leadership role," said Dr. Julie Miller, President of the Board of Trustees. "Her extensive background in the arts, strong business acumen, and intimate knowledge of BAM will help us deliver on our mission and vision."
"BAM is an incredible institution that plays a vital role in the Pacific Northwest and the greater arts community" said Karin Kidder. "I am excited to lead the institution as we embark upon our 71st BAM ARTSfair. Forty-two years after its founding, BAM continues to be known for the quality of its exhibitions and for celebrating emerging and nationally recognized artists. We will continue to feature the same quality exhibitions that represent the best of art, craft, and design, while strengthening our partnerships within the community."

When Kidder first moved to the Pacific Northwest in 1997 she worked with Foster/White Gallery in Seattle and became immersed in the Northwest arts community. Following her time at Foster/White she worked for artist Dale Chihuly, managing his gallery relationships worldwide. Subsequently she lived in London where she worked with London Business School’s Institute of Innovation and Entrepreneurship as the director of several of their programs.
Kidder has worked in international business development and marketing for more than 20 years. She has successfully led organizations with a significant focus on development and outreach, marketing strategy, and community relations. She earned her MBA with a marketing concentration from London Business School in 2008 and has a BA in Art History from Colby College in Waterville, Maine.

Wing Luke Museum Opens Year of Remembrance Today

winglukeOpening today at the Wing Luke Museum, 719 S. King Street, is “Year of Remembrance: Glimpses of a Forever Foreigner,” an exhibit exploring the WWII Japanese American Incarceration in collaboration with artist Roger Shimomura and poet Lawrence Matsuda. Shimomura’s artwork addresses sociopolitical issues of ethnicity. Born in Seattle, he spent two early years of his childhood in Minidoka (Idaho), one of 10 concentration camps for Japanese Americans during WWII. Shimomura’s work is in the permanent collections of more than 100 museums nationwide, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, National Portrait Gallery and the American Art Museum. Image: Classmates, Roger Shimomura, 2015, acrylic on canvas, Courtesy of the artist and the Wing Luke Museum .

LaConner Quilt Museum Changes Name

The LaConner Quilt Museum  is now the Pacific Northwest Quilt & Fiber Arts Museum

and now has a new website to match the new name.

Jim Woodring: The Pig Went Down to the Harbor at Sunrise and Wept Showing at the Frye Museum Through April 16

fryeNow showing through April 16 is work by Seattle-based artist and cartoonist Jim Woodring (American, born 1952) which defies categorization, shifting between graphic novel and fine art, reality and hallucinatory vision. “The Pig Went Down to the Harbor at Sunrise and Wept,” The series, newly commissioned by the Frye Art Museum , was created using an oversize dip pen designed and crafted by Woodring himself. The resulting ink drawings demonstrate the ways that unconventional tools can shape an artist’s practice, generating new technical challenges in tandem with unexpected creative rewards.

Seattle Art Museum Press Release Announces Closing Dates of the Museum for Rehab as February 26–Last Chance to See

samasianSEATTLE, WA – The Seattle Asian Art Museum’s winter exhibition, Tabaimo: Utsutsushi Utsushi, closes Sunday, February 26. The exhibition features new and existing immersive video installations from acclaimed contemporary Japanese artist Tabaimo, alongside historic works from SAM’s Asian art collection chosen by the artist.

This is the final exhibition at the Asian Art Museum before it closes to begin preparations for its upcoming renovation and proposed expansion, pending final approval of the project currently under review by the City of Seattle.

Tabaimo: Utsutsushi Utsushi presents eight video installations by Tabaimo, a globally renowned artist who represented Japan at the 2011 Venice Biennale. Four works created specifically for the exhibition and four previously existing works meld traditional imagery and elements with references to contemporary Japanese comics and animation. In adjacent galleries are paintings, prints, and furnishings from SAM’s collection that inspired the artist, including beloved works such as Katsushika Hokusai’s woodblock prints and the early 17th-century ink-and-gold Crows screens.

The museum’s other installations, all drawn from SAM’s permanent collection, will also close on February 26. These include Terratopia: The Chinese Landscape in Painting and Film, juxtaposing classical Chinese works with a film by contemporary artist Yang Fudong; Awakened Ones: Buddhas of Asia, with sculptures and paintings spanning 13 centuries from all around Asia; and Ai Weiwei: Colored Vases, works by one of China’s most acclaimed contemporary artists and outspoken dissidents.

While the Seattle Asian Art Museum is closed, visitors will be able to see installations from SAM’s Asian art collection at the downtown museum. Currently on view is Pure Amusements: Wealth, Leisure, and Culture in Late Imperial China, featuring Chinese works including prints, sculpture, furnishings, and ceramics that were created for, and enjoyed during, leisurely pursuits.

Image credits: Installation view of Tabaimo: Utsutsushi Utsushi at the Seattle Asian Art Museum. © Seattle Art Museum, Photo: Natali Wiseman.

Al Farrow: Divine Ammunition is on view at Bellevue Arts Museum Now Showing Through May 2017

bamUsing guns and ammunition, Al Farrow creates sculptures of reliquaries, cathedrals, synagogues, mosques, mausoleums, and other devotional objects.  Farrow has had numerous solo exhibitions since 1970 and his work is in many important public and private collections around the world, including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the di Rosa Preserve in Napa, and other collections in New York, Germany, Italy, and Hong Kong

Saint Laurent: The Perfection of Style at the Seattle Art Museum Showing from October 11 Through January 8

samstlaurent“Saint Laurent: The Perfection of Style” will be on view at the Seattle Art Museum from October 11 through January 8.  Drawn from the collection of the Fondation Pierre Bergé – Yves Saint Laurent, the exhibition highlights the legendary designer’s 44-year career and features new acquisitions by the foundation that have never been shown publicly before.

Besides finished garments, the exhibition presents Saint Laurent’s immersive working process from his first sketch and fabric selection to the various stages of production and fitting before a final garment was realized. The multifaceted exhibition is co-curated by Florence Müller, the Avenir Foundation Curator of Textile Art and Curator of Fashion at the Denver Art Museum, in collaboration with Chiyo Ishikawa, SAM’s Deputy Director for Art and Curator of European Painting and Sculpture. The unique installation is designed by architects Nathalie Crinière and  Chloë Degaille of Agence NC, in collaboration with SAM’s exhibition designer Paul Martinez. Shown: "Suzy" doll with eight outfits from her wardrobe, 1953-1955, Paper doll cut out of a magazine and glued onto cardboard, Garments made of paper cut-outs, ink, watercolour and gouache. © Fondation Pierre Bergé – Yves Saint Laurent, Paris. Member preview weekend is Oct.8-10.

Weather Diaries Exhibit at Nordic Heritage Museum

nordicRead the Nordic Heritage Museum exhibition review by Michael Upchurch in the Seattle Times. He calls it,” Eerie, edgy and entirely unexpected, “The Weather Diaries” is a photographic exhibition that uses wild fashion experimentation as an excuse to plunge deep into a Nordic dream world.” Read all about it by clicking on the Seattle Times link. The exhibit will be up through November 6.

Wendy Red Star Winner of the 2016 Betty Bowen Award

Press release just in from the Seattle Art Museum: “The Seattle Art Museum (SAM) and the Betty Bowen Committee, chaired by Gary Glant, announced today that Wendy Red Star is the winner of the 2016 Betty Bowen Award. The award comes with an unrestricted cash award of $15,000. Founded in 1977 to continue the legacy of local arts advocate and supporter Betty Bowen, the annual award honors a Northwest artist for their original, exceptional, and compelling work. Red Star’s work operates at the intersections of traditional Native American culture and colonialist histories and modes of representation; her work will be featured in an installation at the Seattle Art Museum beginning November 10.

In addition, Dawn Cerny was selected to receive the Special Recognition Award in the amount of $2,500, and Mark Mitchell was awarded the Kayla Skinner Special Recognition Award in the amount of $2,500. Five finalists, including Evan Baden and Sadie Wechsler, were chosen from a pool of 446 applicants from Washington, Oregon, and Idaho to compete for the $20,000 in awards.

The award ceremony honoring Red Star, Cerny, and Mitchell will take place on Thursday, November 10 at 5:30 pm at the Seattle Art Museum. The ceremony and reception following the artists’ remarks are free and open to the public.”

Museum of Glass Announces Free Admission September 24

According to a press release issued today, the Museum of Glass “will open its doors free of charge on Saturday, September 24, 2016, as part of  Smithsonian magazine’s 12th annual Museum Day Live! On this day only, participating museums across the United States emulate the spirit of the Smithsonian Institution’s Washington DC-based facilities, which offer free admission every day, and open their doors for free to those who download a Museum Day Live! ticket.”

Barbara Earl Thomas Exhibit Extended Through October 9

bimaJust in from City Arts Magazine: “ Due to popular demand, Bainbridge Island Museum of Art  has proudly extended Barbara Earl Thomas’ exhibition Heaven on Fire through Sunday, October 9. Heaven on Fire is a survey of over sixty artworks, with pieces spanning from the early 1980s to present including paintings, prints, glass sculpture, paper cuts, and a site-specific installation.”

The Seattle Times calls the Bainbridge Island Museum of Art  show "Heaven on Fire" by Barbara Earl Thomas a "must-see."

Peggy Strong Exhibition Opens at Cascadia Art Museum

ccascA Spirit Unbound: The Art of Peggy Strong,” opens September 9 at the Cascadia Art Museum, 190 Sunset Avenue in Edmonds. This is the first retrospective for the artist, featuring works held privately in the family’s collection and never seen by the public until now. Curator David F. Martin, long recognized as the leading authority on Northwest women artists, considers this one of his most important exhibitions. Born in Tacoma, Washington, Peggy Strong (1912-1956) was one of the leading regional artists of the mid-20th century. Despite being paralyzed in the lower half of her body as the result of an automobile accident in 1933, she developed a significant reputation as a painter and muralist.

 

Strong exhibited in many prestigious exhibitions including the national survey of American Art at Rockefeller Center in 1938. She was also one of only sixty women artists to be included in the contemporary art show at the Golden Gate International Exhibition at San Francisco in 1939. Shown: The Sisters, 1938, Private Collection.